Wednesday, January 07, 2009

TIOBE language of the year not Delphi

In october Jim Mckeeth reported that Delphi could well be the language of the year in the TIOBE Community language index.
Unfortunately this has not happened despite the efforts of the Delphi community putting "Delphi programming" on webpages.

In january Delphi is fallen slightly one place back to position 10. (Nothing to worry about). Remarkable is that Pascal went up 3 places compared with last year, now holding the 15th position. I predict that Pascal will become the language of the year 2009! ;-)

Language of the year 2008: C

For what it is worth........

What is your prediction?

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I spoke to some Indian programmers in a pub over the festive season. Very bright guys. They pointed out that, with C, you have far more control over everything than with object oriented languages. "If you need objects for a part of a project, invent an appropriate form instead of fighting with a committee's concept" was what they said.

Anonymous said...

> "If you need objects for a part of a project, invent an appropriate form instead of fighting with a committee's concept"

That's akin to saying, "If you need to go 10 km to get to the store, then build your own car rather than fighting with Ford or Toyota's concept of one".

Delphi supports inline assembly if you really want to get down low to the machine.

C is ideal for embedded systems (right now). But working for an enterprise, I work with a lot of data, meaning a lot of "strings". I would rather gouge my eyes out than do lots of string manipulation and parsing in C. I'm having flashbacks of college.....

I'm not against procedural programming, quite the contrary. I don't think OOP is ever just *better*. Use it where it makes sense.

Anonymous said...

In my opinion, the TIOBE index has a serious problem in that they use the higher value of each "grouping" instead of the sum of all the elements in each group.

In some not too distant future, I expect to see more interest in the D programming language, which is very well suited for the low level needs of Java.
Besides, I expect Java gaining back some interest, and Perl and Ruby been displaced by Python.

Anonymous said...

I hate Cobol programming. I never do Cobol progamming. Who does Cobol programming nowadays? Cobol programming sucks.

I'm going to make Cobol the language of the year.

/Wouter.